Posts Tagged ‘Rolling Stones’

Rolling Stones say definite no to London Olympics concert

February 11, 2012

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Following mounting press speculation about The Rolling Stones taking part in the Olympic Games celebrations in London in July and August, the band have issued an official statement denying any such plans.

”Contrary to a totally inaccurate report in the London Evening Standard, ” says the statement, “The Rolling Stones wish to point out that they are not performing at any concerts tied to the 2012 Olympic Games in Hyde Park or The Olympic Park”.

Read more Rolling Stones stories at: http://www.sh-boommagazine.com

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Robert Johnson and Muddy Waters anniversaries inspire new ‘100 Years of the Blues’ box set

November 16, 2011

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A superb new 4CD box set, titled 100 Years of the Blues, has been released to celebrate the centenary of Robert Johnson’s birth, and also to mark the 60th anniversary of Muddy Waters’ first recording sessions on Stovall’s Cotton Plantation in Mississippi.

The set comprises 91 tracks and traces the story of the blues from the early 20th century right up to the present day.

It comes with a 126-page book and detailed liner notes that describe each stage in the evolution of the blues.

Each CD covers a different era of the blues: Pre War Blues, Urban Blues, The Sixties and Modern Day Blues.

Watch a video and READ THE FULL STORY HERE…

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We’d love to hear what you think in our ‘oldies music’ poll below:

Which artist do you find most uplifting? Leave a comment below and let us know…

Rod Stewart won’t rejoin The Faces until Ronnie Wood quits the Rolling Stones

June 17, 2011

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Rod Stewart says he has ruled out rejoining his old band The Faces until guitarist Ronnie Wood leaves the Rolling Stones. He is concerned that Wood’s heart is not in a Faces reunion because he is still committed to his work with the Stones.

   “The trouble with Ronnie is, we get together and we mess about, but he is still committed to the Stones,” Stewart told US magazine Billboard. “Talking for myself and the rest of the band, we need a commitment – not just, ‘Well, I’ve got next month off’. It doesn’t work like that. It’s not very professional.”

   He added: “If he can give us the time, then I’ll commit to that as well. Until he’s finished with the Stones, whenever that will be, I can’t commit to it.”

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Sh-Boom! is now available as a digital magazine. You can read a sample of the first issue here (best viewed in full-screen mode).

If you’d like to receive a FREE personal copy of each issue, simply SIGN UP at http://www.sh-boommagazine.com/.

It’s FREE TO JOIN, and we’ll send the magazine direct to you when published.

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Pop music TV pioneer Clay Cole dies at 72

December 30, 2010

Visit our main website at: http://www.sh-boommagazine.com

Clay Cole – whose groundbreaking US TV and radio shows in the 1950s and 1960s helped to launch the careers of many rock ‘n’ roll greats – died on December 18, 2010 at his home on Oak Island, N.C. He was 72. The cause was a heart attack, his brother Richard Rucker said.

Anyone who grew up loving all those great US hits of the late 1950s and early 1960s owes Clay Cole a huge debt of gratitude. Many early US rock and pop artists might never have been heard in the UK and Europe had they not first been popularised on his TV and radio shows in New York, and then gone on to achieve huge chart success across the United States.

In his recent book Sh-Boom! – The Explosion of Rock ‘N’ Roll (1953-1968), Clay Cole gave a compelling personal account of his years spent hosting his own Saturday night pop music television show, The Clay Cole Show. It’s an important book that doesn’t just chronicle the beginnings of rock ‘n’ roll, it is also a first-hand record of how it felt to be there.

He was only 15 – and still at high school in Ohio – when, in 1953, he began presenting his own local teenage music TV show. By 1955, the music had evolved and he found himself hosting one of the first rock ‘n’ roll TV shows.

In 1957, he moved to New York City to try his luck, armed with “a 10 year plan” for success. In fact, it only took a few months for him to land a Saturday evening live TV show in Providence, Rhode Island.

By 1959, at the age of 21 (although the TV channel’s publicity department claimed he was only 19), he was hosting a major TV show in New York. He was the youngest host on US TV – and already challenging for the crown held by the legendary Alan Freed and Dick Clark.

When Alan Freed’s TV career was ended by the music industry payola scandal of 1959, it proved to be a stroke of luck for Clay Cole. After less than two months on air, he now had a “clear reign” on New York television. “I was spotless … I was never offered, nor would I accept, payola,” he said.

The Clay Cole Show attracted all the big names of the day, including Bobby Darin, Tony Bennett, Ray Charles, Brenda Lee and Connie Francis (who later confessed she’d always had a secret crush on him).

With a good ear for a hit, Cole also became a champion of talented newcomers, such as Paul Anka, Neil Sedaka, Tony Orlando, Dionne Warwick, Neil Diamond, Bobby Vinton, the Four Seasons, and Dion. In 1960, he launched a nightclub tour and hired three teenage sisters as dancers. They would later become The Ronettes.

He was the first to introduce Chubby Checker performing ‘The Twist’. And the first to present the Rolling Stones in America. He also pioneered music video clips and go-go girls, and gave debuts to young stand-up comedians like Richard Pryor.

Cole also helped to break the colour barrier on US television. He was the first rock ‘n’ roll TV host to have a multi-racial audience and regularly featured soul and R&B artists such as Ray Charles, Little Anthony and The Imperials, Steve Wonder, The Supremes and Dionne Warwick – often in direct defiance of his TV bosses who warned him he was welcoming too many black artists onto the show.

A singer and dancer himself, he once sang on stage with the Four Seasons after being invited to “sing along” by his friend Frankie Valli. “I was so intimidated by their perfect harmonies,” Cole recalled, “I simply mouthed the words and snapped my fingers – to their great relief, I’m sure.”

It was the shift to acid rock and heavy metal that eventually prompted Clay Cole to walk away from his highly popular TV show in 1968, at the age of 30. His final show featured Jerry Lewis, Paul Anka, and the Cowsills.

Over the 40 years that followed, he was the writer, producer and director of over 3500 broadcast TV shows, including several award-winning programmes.

As his friend Laura Pinto (pictured left with Clay) told Sh-Boom! Magazine: “He was a terrific human being. Clay Cole has done much for the golden age of rock and roll, and there are many artists out there who owe him a debt of gratitude – as we all do.”

Clay Cole is survived by his brothers Richard Rucker and James Rucker, and a sister, Tama Rucker.

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We’ll soon be launching Sh-Boom! as a digital magazine. You can read a sample edition of the magazine here (best viewed in full-screen mode).

If you’d like to receive a FREE personal copy of each issue, simply SIGN UP at http://www.sh-boommagazine.com.

It’s FREE TO JOIN, and we’ll email the magazine direct to you.

And tell your friends about us too!

Telling it like it was: Clay Cole’s “Sh-Boom! – The Explosion of Rock ‘N’ Roll, 1953-1968”

August 22, 2010

The name Clay Cole may not be too familiar to some Sh-Boom! Magazine readers in the UK and Europe, but anyone who grew up loving all those great US hits of the late 1950s and early 1960s owes him a debt of gratitude.

Many early US rock and pop artists might never have been heard in Europe had they not first been popularised on Clay Cole’s TV and radio shows in New York, and then gone on to achieve huge chart success across the United States.

In his new book Sh-Boom! – The Explosion of Rock ‘N’ Roll (1953-1968), New York television personality Clay Cole gives a compelling personal account of his years spent hosting his own Saturday night pop music television show, The Clay Cole Show.

But this is no typical showbiz autobiography. In a fast-paced, conversational and witty style, Cole combines highly personal recollections with a comprehensive and detailed history of rock ‘n’ roll itself. Packed with fascinating facts and funny anecdotes, it’s a behind-the-scenes look at the shaping of an era. It’s pop music history told from the inside out, by someone who was there at the beginning.

He was only 15 – and still at high school in Ohio – when, in 1953, he began presenting his own local teenage music TV show. By 1955, the music had evolved and he recalls: “I was, without fully becoming aware, now hosting a rock ‘n’ roll show”.

In 1957, he moved to New York City to try his luck, armed with “a 10 year plan” for success. In fact, it only took a few months for him to land a Saturday evening live TV show in Providence, Rhode Island.

By 1959, at the age of 21 (although the TV channel’s publicity department claimed he was only 19), he was hosting a major TV show in New York. He was the youngest host on US TV – and already challenging for the crown held by the legendary Alan Freed and Dick Clark.

When Alan Freed’s TV career was ended by the great music industry payola scandal of 1959, it proved to be a stroke of luck for Clay Cole. After less than two months on air, he now had a “clear reign” on New York television. “I was spotless … I was never offered, nor would I accept, payola,” he says.

The Clay Cole Show attracted all the big names of the day, including Bobby Darin, Tony Bennett, Ray Charles, Brenda Lee and Connie Francis (who later confessed she’d always had a secret crush on him).

With a good ear for a hit, Cole also became a champion of talented newcomers, such as Paul Anka, Neil Sedaka, Tony Orlando, Dionne Warwick, Neil Diamond, Bobby Vinton, the Four Seasons, and Dion. In 1960, he launched a nightclub tour and hired three teenage sisters as dancers. They would later become The Ronettes.

He was the first to introduce Chubby Checker performing ‘The Twist’. And the first to present the Rolling Stones in America. He also pioneered music video clips and go-go girls, and gave debuts to young stand-up comedians like Richard Pryor.

Cole also helped to break the colour barrier on US television. He was the first rock ‘n’ roll TV host to have a multi-racial audience and regularly featured soul and R&B artists such as Ray Charles, Little Anthony and The Imperials, Steve Wonder, The Supremes and Dionne Warwick – often in direct defiance of his TV bosses who warned him he was welcoming too many black artists onto the show.

A singer and dancer himself, he once sang on stage with the Four Seasons after being invited to “sing along” by his friend Frankie Valli. “I was so intimidated by their perfect harmonies,” says Cole, “I simply mouthed the words and snapped my fingers – to their great relief, I’m sure.”

Sh-Boom! – The Explosion of Rock ‘N’ Roll (1953-1968) covers Clay Cole’s “fifteen years of TV fame” – and explores every pop music phenomenon from rhythm and blues, cover records, rockabilly, folk-rock, teen idols, and girl groups … to the arrival of The Beatles, the British Invasion, the creation of the American boy band, and Flower Power.

It was the shift to acid rock and heavy metal that eventually prompted Clay Cole to walk away from his highly popular TV show in 1968, at the age of 30. He realised he’d become “a black-tie, tuxedo guy, adrift in a tie-dyed T-shirt world”. His final show featured Jerry Lewis, Paul Anka, and the Cowsills.

Over the 40 years since, he has been the writer, producer and director of over 3500 broadcast TV shows, including several award-winning programmes.

Sh-Boom!’ … great title for a song … great name (we think) for a music magazine for ‘baby boomers’ … and now a great title for an important book that doesn’t just chronicle the early beginnings of rock ‘n’ roll, it tells you how it felt to be there.

Sh-Boom! – The Explosion of Rock ‘N’ Roll (1953-1968) can be purchased from Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com. It is also available direct from the Clay Cole website at www.claycoleshow.com

UPDATE:  We are sad to report that Clay Cole died on December 18, 2010 at his home on Oak Island, N.C. He was 72. The cause was a heart attack, his brother Richard Rucker said. In addition to his brother, he is survived by another brother, James Rucker, and a sister, Tama Rucker. 

 

The Faces to reform?

July 11, 2008

The Faces keyboard player Ian McLagan has confirmed that he and the surviving members of the band – Rod Stewart, Ronnie Wood and Kenney Jones – are considering a reunion.

 

There has been speculation about The Faces reuniting for a one-off concert for the past couple of years. This time, though, it looks like it might happen – perhaps by the end of the year.

 

McLagan said the band members had all agreed to reform and it is just a case of trying to find a time that is convenient for everyone.

 

“Rod hasn’t wanted to do it for a long time; he didn’t see the need,” McLagan told BBC 6Music. “But I think he really wants to now. It’s going to be great if it does happen.”

 

Meanwhile, The Sun has reported that Rod Stewart and Ronnie Wood recently met at a restaurant in London’s Mayfair to discuss the possibility of returning to the recording studio with the band. According to some reports, they may start recording an album this autumn, followed by a winter tour.

 

Stewart has always maintained that The Faces would not be The Faces without bass player and singer Ronnie Lane who died in 1997, aged 51, two decades after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.

 

But two years ago, Stewart hinted that he would consider reuniting The Faces “for the right reasons” – such as a big one-off charity event.

 

The Faces were formed in 1969 after frontman Steve Marriott left The Small Faces to form Humble Pie. The remaining members – Ronnie Lane, Ian McLagan and Kenney Jones – poached Rod Stewart and Ronnie Wood from the Jeff Beck Group and they became The Faces.

 

The Faces released four studio albums which included hits such as ‘Stay With Me’ and ‘Ooh La La’. They toured regularly from 1970 to 1975, although a disillusioned Ronnie Lane left the band in 1973, and Stewart simultaneously pursued a solo career. During the band’s final year, Wood also toured with The Rolling Stones, whom he later joined.

“You can’t always get what you want”, sang the Stones. You can if you’ve got £3.5m handy

July 11, 2008

If you’re planning a party and you’ve set aside £3.5 million to book a band, the Rolling Stones might just be available …

 

According to a new book by Imogen Edward-Jones, Pop Babylon, the Stones charge more for private gigs than any other artist. Her research for the book revealed that the band demand a staggering £3.5 million for each private performance.

 

The figure dwarfs the sums being paid to other artists. Sir Elton John, Robbie Williams, Rod Stewart and Amy Winehouse are said to command up to £1 million for a private concert, while Janet Jackson and the Pussycat Dolls charge around £500,000 per show.

 

If you’re on a tight budget, you might be able to get Sting or the Sugababes for around £250,000, while Girls Aloud reportedly charge £200,000 to play at private parties.

 

“Even old favourites such as Rick Astley and the Human League have dusted themselves off and are available for weddings and bar mitzvahs,” said Pop Babylon author Imogen Edward-Jones. “So no matter how big or small your budget, there appears to be a band to suit you.”

 

Anybody got a phone number for The Wurzels?


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